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FIVM Seminar Series - Use of body-mounted inertial sensors to evaluate lameness in animals

Dr. Kevin Keegan of University of Missouri College of Veterinary Medicine will talk about innovative approaches for detecting and evaluating lameness in horsess

Dr. Kevin Keegan, Professor - Equine Surgery, University of Missouri College of Veterinary Medicine, Diplomate American College of Veterinary Surgeons (ACVS)

Dr. Kevin Keegan is an expert in equine lameness and will talk about innovative approaches for detecting and evaluating lameness in horses.

On Friday, February 20, Dr. Keegan will explain the use of body-mounted inertial sensors, which can be designed to be small and light enough so that normal movement is unrestricted.  And wireless transmission of body-mounted inertial sensor data provides a means to collect and analyze live movement.  These associations and capabilities provide a means for the development a lameness diagnostic tool for investigative and regular clinical use.

Dr. Keegan graduated from the University of Missouri’s College of Veterinary Medicine in 1983.  After graduation he spent two years in private equine ambulatory and surgical practice on the east coast of the United States, primarily concentrating on racing Standardbred horses.  He completed an equine surgery residency and Masters in Veterinary Clinical Medicine at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign from 1986-1989.  While at the University of Illinois Dr. Keegan studied biomechanics and bioengineering at the College of Engineering.  After completing the surgical residency he returned to private practice in a surgical referral and race track practice outside Detroit, Michigan for one year.

In 1990, Dr. Keegan returned to his alma mater, the University of Missouri, College of Veterinary Medicine as a clinical instructor.  He became board certified in the American College of Veterinary Surgeons in 1995.  Dr. Keegan was named Director of the E. Paige Laurie Endowed Program in Equine Lameness in 2005 and became full professor in the College of Veterinary Medicine in 2006.

In 2008, Dr. Keegan and co-inventors of a body-mounted inertial sensor system founded Equinosis LLC, a University of Missouri faculty-startup company.  Dr. Keegan’s research in kinematics and lameness led to the development of a body-mounted inertial sensor system, now called Lameness Locator, presently used as an objective aid for veterinarians for detection and evaluation of lameness in horses.

Today, Dr. Keegan has a 50 percent clinical appointment in the Veterinary Teaching Hospital and 50 percent research position in the Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery at the University of Missouri.  His research program is partially supported by private endowments and the National Science Foundation’s Small Business Technology Transfer Program.